“Modality and Modalities”  will be a three day event on all things Modal Logical.
This event will be held on Thursday, 22th May, Friday, 23th May, Saturday, 24th May
at the Philosophy Department, Lund University, Sweden

Our keynote speakers are: 
Melvin Fitting, Jerry Seligman, Sonja Smets and Timothy Williamson

Special Tutorial Presentation by Sara Uckelman

Local Organisation: Jens Ulrik Hansen and Carlo Proietti

Contributors
Staffan Angere
Martin Mose Bentzen
Jens Christian Bjerring
Patrick Blackburn
Thomas Bolander

Torben Braüner
Zoé Christoff
Giovanni Cina
Sebastian Enqvist
Melvin Fitting
Valentin Goranko 
Jens Ulrik Hansen
Vincent Fella Hendricks
Martin Holm Jensen
Klaus Frovin Jørgensen
Nikolaj Nottelmann
Peter Øhrstrøm
Carlo Proietti

Rasmus K. Rendsvig
Jerry Seligman

Sonja Smets
Sara Uckelman
Timothy Williamson


For more detailed information, visit the M&M website: http://modalityandmodalities.weebly.com/mm2014.html

All are welcome to attend, and attendance is free.
But please: email  [cadillacdk @ gmail.com]   if you plan on attending, so that we know how many guests to expect.
 
 
Here is some preliminary information about Mathematical Reflections, which will take place on 20 May 2014 at the Philosophy Department, Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark.

The event is an all-day seminar on topics in the History, Philosophy and Logic of Mathematics. The speakers are:  Jessica Carter, Melvin Fitting, Tinne Hoff Kjeldsen, Øystein Linnebo, Stig Andur Pedersen, Stewart Shapiro, and Asger Törnquist. You can find the event's website here:

http://cadillac-dk.weebly.com/mathematical-reflections-2014.html


 
 
Friday 4 April 2014, DTU Compute at the Technical University of Denmark will host a workshop on Planning, Logic and Social Intelligence.

Time and place: Room S12, DTU Meeting Centre, building 101, 4 April 9.30-17.00.
Host: Thomas Bolander

There will be talks by the following 5 prominent guests:
09.30-10.30 Andreas Herzig, IRIT Toulouse: On the revision of planning tasks
11.00-12.00 Patrick Blackburn, University of Roskilde: Negotiating Context
13.00-14.00 Jens Ulrik Hansen, Lund University: A partial version of Dynamic Epistemic Logic
14.30-15.30 Thomas Ågotnes, University of Bergen: Some Aspects of Knowledge and Ability
16.00-17.00 Ron Petrick, University of Edinburgh: What would you like to drink? Knowledge-level planning for a social robot bartender 

For more details, including detailed schedule and abstracts of the 5 talks, consult the workshop homepage: http://www2.compute.dtu.dk/~tobo/mhj-workshop/index.php
 
 
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There  will be a small CADILLAC workshop at Roskilde University (RUC) on Thursday 5th of December. Here's the program:

13:00 - 14:00 Klaus F. Joergensen (RUC): On the semantics of temporal indexicals
14:00 - 14:15 Coffee Break
14:15 - 15:15 Nikolaj Nottelmann (Odense): The modal profile of knowledge. An interventionist approach.
15:15 - 15:30 Coffee Break
15:30 - 16:30 Zeng Weiping (Xiamen): On the syntax tradition of formal epistemology
16:30 - Wine and snacks

Patrick Blackburn (RUC) will chair the afternoon and the workshop will take place in the seminar-room in building 3.1.3.
All are most welcome!
 

CONTEXT'13

28/10/2013

 
The Eighth International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context (CONTEXT'13)  will provide a forum for presenting and discussing high-quality research and applications on context modeling and use. The conference will include paper and poster presentations, system demonstrations, workshops, and a doctoral consortium. The conference invites researchers and practitioners to share insights and cutting-edge results from a wide range of disciplines including:
  • Computer Science,
  • Artificial Intelligence and Ubiquitous Computing,
  • Cognitive Science,
  • Linguistics,
  • Organizational Sciences,
  • Philosophy,
  • Psychology,
  • Application areas such as Medicine, Law, domotics, context-aware systems, ...
Context affects a wide range of activities in humans and animals as well as in artificial agents and other systems. The importance of context is widely acknowledged, and “context” has become an area of study in its own right, as evidenced by numerous workshops, symposia, seminars, and conferences on this area. CONTEXT, the oldest conference series focusing on context, is unique in its emphasis on interdisciplinary research. Previous CONTEXT conferences have been held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (CONTEXT'97), Trento, Italy (CONTEXT'99, LNCS 1688), Dundee, Scotland (CONTEXT'01, LNCS 2116), Palo Alto, U.S.A. (CONTEXT'03, LNCS 2680), Paris, France (CONTEXT'05, LNCS 3554), Roskilde, Denmark (CONTEXT'07 LNCS 4635), Karlsruhe (CONTEXT'11, LNCS 6967). Each of these conferences brought together researchers and practitioners from many disparate fields to discuss and report on context-related research and projects.

http://www.polytech.univ-savoie.fr/index.php?id=2218
 

ESSLLI 2013

14/08/2013

 
The 25th European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information (ESSLLI 2013) will be held at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany, August 5-16, 2013.

Patrick Blackburn
ABSTRACT:
Past, Present and Future

Arthur Prior (1914 - 1969) was a philosophical logician, best known for his invention of tense logic. He died 20 years before the first ESSLLI was held in Groningen in 1989, but his influence on contemporary modal logic and natural language semantics means that his presence can still be felt at these summer schools. 
In this talk I will be examining Prior's logical legacy from the perspective of contemporary modal and hybrid logic. But my aim is not to chart exactly what Prior did and when, rather it is to sketch a partial outline of what the `logic' in Philosophical Logic meant to Prior, and to contrast this with its meaning in Logic, Language and Information. A Quixotic task perhaps, but along the way we will have good company, most notably that of Hans Kamp and Johan van Benthem, two logicians who have contributed so much to the way we understand `logic' in these summer schools. I'll leave younger ESSLLI participants to decide what this might have  to do with the logic of tomorrow.

============ About ESSLLI:
The European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information (ESSLLI) is organized every year by the Association for Logic, Language and Information (FoLLI) in different sites around Europe. Under the auspices of FoLLI (the Association for Logic, Language, and Information), ESSLLI brings together logicians, linguists, computer scientists, and philosophers to study language, logic, and information, and their interconnections. The school hosts approximately 50 courses at both introductory and advanced levels, and brings together around 500 participants from all over the world. Along with the courses, ESSLLI hosts workshops and invited lectures, providing opportunities for in-depth discussion of current research.

Previous ESSLLIs have been held in Opole (2012)Ljubljana (2011)Copenhagen (2010), andBordeaux (2009). We are very proud to be hosting the 25th ESSLLI in Düsseldorf and we look forward to seeing you there!

Under the auspices of FoLLI (the Association for Logic, Language, and Information) and of the Vice President for Research and Innovation of the University of Düsseldorf.
http://esslli2013.de/
 
 
Deduction in Modal and Hybrid Logic

Patrick Blackburn
Department of Philosophy and Science Studies
University of Roskilde
Thursday 13 June 2013, 16.15 until 17.45, 

Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP)
http://www.mcmp.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/index.html

I will be the first to admit that this title is unlikely to set anyone's pulse racing. Problems in modal deduction? What is hybrid logic anyway? And why should anyone care?

Fair questions, and ones I will tackle in the talk. In essence, I will be sketching an overview of why modal deduction is tricky, and why hybrid logic fixes (some of) its problems. Themes I will emphasize include the second-order nature of modal logic, how hybrid logic yields a first-order perspective on frame structure, and how ''non-standard'' hybrid inference rules turn out to be sequent rules ''missing'' from orthodox modal logic, and completeness via Henkin constructions.

And there is a cherry on the cake. If I had given this talk even five weeks ago, I would have concluded by saying that basic hybrid deduction is now well understood. Well, it turns out there is more to be said, and (time permitting) I shall close the talk by mentioning some very recent joint work with Thomas Bolander, Torben Braüner, and  Klaus Frovin Jørgensen on what we term Seligman-style tableaux, in honour of classic (but somewhat overlooked) work by Jerry Seligman dating back to the 1990s on hybrid deduction.

I intend to make the talk relatively self contained and won't presuppose any particular expertise in modal (let alone hybrid) logic. But for those of you who who would like to do some reading in advance, here are some suggestions:

Hybrid Logic, Chapter 7, Section 3 of Modal Logic, by Patrick Blackburn, Maarten de Rijke, and Yde Venema, Cambridge University Press, 2001, pages 434-445.

Pure Extensions, Proof Rules, and Hybrid Axiomatics, by Patrick Blackburn and Balder ten Cate, Studia Logica, volume 84, pages 277-322, 2006.

Internalisation: The Case of Hybrid Logics, by Jerry Seligman, Journal of Logic and Computation, volume 11, pages 671-689, 2001.

 
 
http://www.flov.gu.se/english/research/human-reasoning/




Friday, 7 June, 2013

Time: 10:15 - 12:00
Place: University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Room T116 at the Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, Gamla Hovrätten 
Olof Wijksgatan 6. Enter through the main entrance. Continue straight on for ten meters (do not take the stairway). Then turn left and continue until the corridor ends. Enter through the glass door, turn left and continue five meters.http://www.flov.gu.se/english/research/human-reasoning/

Hybrid Deduction

Patrick Blackburn
Department of Philosophy and Science Studies
University of Roskilde

In this talk I will discuss why modal deduction is tricky, and why hybrid logic fixes (some of) its problems. Themes I will emphasize include the second-order nature of modal logic, how hybrid logic yields a first-order perspective on frame structure, and how ''non-standard'' hybrid inference rules turn out to be sequent rules ''missing'' from orthodox modal logic. I shall close the talk by discussing recent joint work with Thomas Bolander, Torben Braüner, and  Klaus Frovin Jørgensen on what we term Seligman-style tableaux, in honour of classic (but overlooked) work by Jerry Seligman from the 1990s on hybrid deduction.

The talk will be relatively self contained and won't presuppose any particular expertise in modal (let alone hybrid) logic. Indeed, one of my main aims will be to make the intuitions underlying modal and hybrid logic clear to non-specialists.

 

GCTP 2013

18/04/2013

 
Groningen, Netherlands
Thursday 18th - Saturday 20th April 2013

The Department of Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Groningen is proud to organize and host the Dutch graduate conference focusing on topics within theoretical philosophy. The aim of the conference is to give graduate students working within some field of theoretical philosophy (e.g. epistemology, logic, metaphysics, philosophy of science / mind / language, etc.) the opportunity to present their work in progress and to get to know each other. Students from outside of the Netherlands are most welcome. To further enhance the experience, four professional keynote speakers will also be giving a talk providing inspiration for new ideas.

Keynote Speakers
We are proud to present the following keynote speakers:

    Patrick Blackburn
    John Dupré
    Hannes Leitgeb
    Ruth Millikan 


http://www.philos.rug.nl/GCTP2013/
 
 
Brussels, Belgium
March 14-15, 2013
Honouring Paul Gochet
Program to be posted...

ABSTRACT:
On the character of temporal indexicals

Patrick Blackburn
University of Roskilde
Denmark

In this talk (which is based on joint work with Klaus Frovin Jørgensen) I re-examine early work on the semantics of temporal indexicals through the lens of modern hybrid logic. Modern hybrid logic is a natural tool for handling many varieties of temporal reference, and as I shall show, this suitability extends even to temporal indexicals such as Now, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

The key  idea is to return to the classic work of Hans Kamp and David Kaplan on this topic. However, instead of exploiting their two-dimensional semantics using additional modalities, we make use of character-encoding propositional symbols instead. One of these symbols (namely Now) turns out to work much like an ordinary nominal, and this enables us to unlock the logic of indexicality in an extremely  general way.

I won't be assuming much knowledge of logic or linguistics in this talk. Rather my aim will be to present a clear overview of the issues involved and to explain in accessible terms how hybrid logic gives us simple solutions to some rather tricky issues.